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Chefs Are Becoming Scarce In Australia!


Chefs Are Becoming Scarce In Australia!

The hospitality industry is facing a chef shortage crisis as they are becoming really hard to find.

The rise of the celebrity chef and the cooking show star machine is sending the wrong messages to would-be chefs and contributing to skills shortages.

That's the view of Massimo Bottura whose restaurant Osteria Francescana was last year ranked as the number one restaurant in the world.

The rise of the celebrity chef and the cooking show star machine is sending the wrong messages to would-be chefs and contributing to skills shortages. "Too many people, too many young men and women are driven by the wrong stimulation to become a chef," Bottura told Fairfax Media.

"The television is sending out a message like, you are going to be a star you are going to be a master chef. That is wrong. Our job is all about hard work and a little bit of talent."

Bottura was in the army of chefs and industry dignitaries arriving in Melbourne for the Wednesday night's World’s Best 50 restaurants.

Chefs Daniel Humm, Luke Mangan, Peter Gilmore, Massimo Bottura and Brett Graham in Melbourne ahead of the World's 50 ...

Chefs Daniel Humm, Luke Mangan, Peter Gilmore, Massimo Bottura and Brett Graham in Melbourne ahead of the World's 50 Best Restaurants.

Bottura spelled it out: working as a chef is a grind, it’s damn hard work and that might put many people off.

"It's a job when everyone else is out enjoying themselves on a Saturday night you are in the middle of the most difficult service," he said. "The pressure is unbelievable. In the Osteria every day we play the final of the World Cup lunch and dinner."

"They have this expectation that within a couple of years they are all going to be rockstars. When I started cooking that was the furthest thing from my mind. The reality of it hits home, it is hard graft and long hours. I'm not seeing people staying as long as they used to and it is a real worry. It is a long haul."

The problem facing Australia’s restaurants and eateries was highlighted in a 2015 Deloitte Access Economics report.

The report showed there is a gap of 38,000 staff across the tourism and hospitality sector.

And it forecasts that shortage will increase to 123,000 by 2020.

What makes it more complicated is that over half of all hospitality TAFE students are dropping out.

"It is a hard industry but you have to persevere. You have to be committed, you have to be passionate you have to work hard. The beauty of our business is if you do that you can travel the world, you can meet interesting people, you can eat great food. I keep saying the world is your oyster."


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